Cloud is the future, because it provides a scalable and flexible infrastructure that is achievable “without large investment”, according to Bogdan Frusina, founder of Dejero.

Cloud is a horizon within broadcasters’ reach

With the many functions and roles cloud can potentially play across many different media applications across the broadcast chain, the technology is poised to be a game-changer in shaping the future of the media industry

Video distribution today is not solely restricted to within the country or region where a broadcaster is licensed to operate. Consumption patterns have changed, especially when audiences are increasingly streaming videos via the Internet. Through streaming, content can be delivered to audiences in almost any part of the world.

To support content distribution on such a global scale, broadcasters and service providers will require an infrastructure that empowers them to introduce innovations quickly, so as to adapt to market dynamics and keep their audiences captivated.

One technology that has been tapped, in having the potential to shape the future of the broadcast and media industry, is cloud.

Bogdan Frusina, founder of Dejero, tells APB: “The media industry has moved to IT. Analogue barely exists in the industry; nearly all content storage is in the form of electronic files. We sit as part of the IT industry now, taking advantage of its economies-of-scale and, of course, the ability to use the cloud.”

Claiming that cloud is the future, Frusina explains that the technology provides a scalable and flexible infrastructure that is achievable “without large investment”. For instance, if a TV network was to set up traditional data storage — comparable to the cloud — they might not be able to recoup their investment.

The biggest driver for cloud adoption is the growing size of files, and the increasing need for processing, he says. “Content producers need to store content from their archives to their current productions. They want to store it in the best possible quality, so they are using high bitrate codecs, and embracing 4K/Ultra HD (UHD) and high dynamic range (HDR).

Read the full story in the APB Aug 2018 issue.

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